Tag Archives: science communication

Sciencey things for kids (young and old) to do at the beach

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This may seem a bit geeky, but while you’re at the beach why not check out some of the things that like to live at beaches, or in the sea, the air, beneath the sand or on rocks. There are other things like waves that are pretty cool, especially if you like surfing, boogie-boarding or sailing, or even just looking at them to see how they work.  Scientists ask questions like;

what is it?

how does it work or how does it live?

how does it react to other things going on at the beach (including what people do)?

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TIME travel for Kids

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Hi Kids.

1000 of theseIn this post, I’m going to talk about TIME and take you on an adventure. I’m a GEOLOGIST so I talk about TIME a fair bit. The TIME I talk about is usually in thousands or millions or billions of years. These are really big numbers so how do I know what they mean; what is a million years really like?

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Science in a Social Context

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timeline peopleScience in a Social Context, 1859 to 1920

I have created this Science in Context chart, partly because I am interested in the links, or the possibility of links among Science and other human endeavours like art, politics and so on. Science has never taken place in a vacuum; people who have conducted scientific investigations have had affiliations with or have needed to react to political or religious forces that helped shape our world – in some cases reacting simply to survive the vagaries of current ideologies. Science during the Renaissance and Enlightenment was often in conflict with prevailing religious dogmas. Thomas Kuhn, scientist and philosopher (of paradigm fame), would argue that this “tension” between science and the Church was crucial to the advancement of science in the Western, predominantly European world. In contrast to this often brutal conflict, eastern religions tended to coexist more harmoniously with their scientific cousins.

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